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Waagen, Gustav Friedrich

Full Name: Waagen, Gustav Friedrich

Gender: male

Date Born: 1797

Date Died: 1868

Place Born: Hamburg, Germany

Place Died: Copenhagen, Hovedstaden, Denmark

Home Country/ies: Germany


Overview

Director of the Berlin Gemäldegalerie1830, and first professor of art history in Berlin; leader of the so-called Berlin School of art history. Waagen’s father was the painter Christian Friedrich Waagen (b. 1750) and mother was Johanna Luise Alberti (Waagen) (d.1807). The young Waagen was taken taken to art galleries as early as Dresden in 1801. His uncle was the romantic novelist Ludwig Tieck (1773-1853). Waagen attended the Gymnasium in Hirschberg, (Silesia) Germany. He spent a lengthy period in Rome with the German artists community living in there, including Schnorr von Carolsfeld, Joseph Anton Koch and J. F. Overbeck before his formal schooling. He volunteered in the Prussian army in 1813 to fight Napoleon and at his defeat in 1815, spent time in the Musée Napoléon, studying treasures before their repatriation. He began academic study at the university of Breslau (modern Poland) studying history, philosophy and philology in 1815 under the historian and Friedrich von Raumer (1781-1873). In 1818 he moved to Heidelberg where he studied the art collection of the brothers Sulpiz Boisserée and Melchior Boisserée. At Heidelberg he studied under the historians Friedrich Christoph Schlosser and the philologist Georg Friedrich Creuzer. He graduated with a degree in History in 1819 from Breslau. Throughout his career, the assistance of his friend and mentor Karl Friedrich von Rumohr introduced through his uncle, would be essential. Waagen visited Cologne, Aachen and the Netherlands after graduation (also in 1819), collecting material for a book on the van Eyck brothers. The work, über Hubrecht und Johann Van Eyck, 1822, was the first catalogue raisonné of painters. It also reevaluated the painting of the northern renaissance, which had been relegated to second-rate status through most of the eighteenth century. Waagen settled Munich 1820-23 before returning to Berlin to assist with the plans for comprehensive art museum akin to Paris, Munich and Dresden. In 1821 he assisted the purchase, together with Hirt and Rumohr, of the spectacular Edward Solly Collection (677 works). In 1824 he and the architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel visited Rome to study museums. A commission, headed by Wilhelm von Humbold and comprising Aloys Hirt and Rumohr among others was set up. When Humbold relinquished his duties as head of the committee, Rumohr nominated Waagen to head it. Waagen took charge of the Königliche Gemäldegalerie (Royal Paintings gallery) in 1830. He set about immediately issuing the first catalog of the collections. He married Blandine von Seehausen (1811-1880) in 1831. In 1833 he published his essays on Rubens, staunchly defending the baroque era and comparing Rubens to Beethoven. The book appeared in an English translation edited by Anna Jameson. In 1836 published his Kunstwerke und Künstler in England and Paris, the first attempt at survey of English art by any art historian. Always the exponent for the northern renaissance, Waagen published his second art-historical milestone, Handbuch der deutschen und niederländische Malerschulen which was translated into English and French. Waagen’s acquisitions for the Gemäldegalerie, many done with the likely advice of Rumohr, were spectacular. Waagen was a voracious traveler, in part through a discontent with the Prussian administration. He compiled large surveys of art of many European countries. In 1839 Waagen was the object of a public quarrel with the acting General Director of the Prussian Museums, Ignaz von Olfers (1793-1872). A work of Andrea del Sarto had been disastrously cleaned during one of Waagen’s many absences. The matter was only resolved in the Prussian senate. Waagen acquired a further 104 paintings acquired for the museum in Italy 1842. In 1844 Waagen was named “Professor of Modern Art History” at the University of Berlin, the first time art history was formally acknowledged as a university discipline. Waagen retained a particularly strong connection with England. He contributed, with G. B. Cavalcaselle and Johann David Passavant, to the catalog for the city of Liverpool Gallery, commissioned by Charles Lock Eastlake in 1850. In 1853, he examined the Berlin (later Darmstadt) version of Hans Holbein’s Burgomeister Meyer Madonna, now known to be the original. His opinion came to be part of the body of critical opinion considered in the so-called “Holbein convention” held in 1871. In 1854 he cataloged Prince Albert’s collection recently acquired from Prince Ludwig-Kraft-Ernst von Oetingen Wallerstein. He was reputedly considered the Prince’s choice to lead the National Gallery and was on personal terms with Eastlake, now its director, and Elizabeth Rigby Eastlake, who translated his book Treasures of Art in Great Britain (1854-57). He died suddenly while visiting Copenhagen and is buried in the Assistenz-Friedhof there. Julius Meyer succeeded him as director of the Gemäldegalerie. Waagen’s pre-eminence for art history lies in his conviction of the discipline. His book on the van Eyck was both the first monograph on either brother as well as the first catalogue raisonné of an individual painter. Unlike previous writers on art history, Waagen worked for a serious factual account of his artists. He was eager to disprove the legends surrounding the van Eycks, beginning with Vasari’s assertion that the invention of oil painting began with them. His catalogue raisonné arose from the need to establish a chronology of their work for future art historians to use (or modify) and to place them their work within the context of their contemporaries. Waagen also included spurious works in the catalog, envisioning the usefulness for collectors. He had a profound appreciation for the advances in connoisseurship that the Storia Pittorica of Luigi Antonio Lanzi had brought. His Kunstwerke und Künstler in England und Paris was greatly influenced by Passavant’s Kunstreise (1833). His personal tastes were of the time: he deplored Caravaggio as “low” and some contemporary work such as Turner and Fuseli. Together with Rumohr, he is seen as an early exponent of contextualizing art history of Renaissance artists. Waagen (preceded only by Franz Kugler, two years earlier) was among the first to use both the terms “Carolingian” and Ottonian for the unique style of Romanesque art first observed by Johann Dominico Fiorillo. Waagen’s “Ottonian art” concept emphasized its revival of antique modes following the Carolingian renaissance.


Selected Bibliography

über Hubert und Johann Van Eyck. Breslau: J. Max, 1822; Kunstwerke und Künstler in England and Paris. Berlin: 1837, English, [first two volumes only] Works of Art and Artists in England. London: J. Murray, 1838; Kunstwerke und Künstler in Deutschland. 2 vols. Leipzig: F. A. Brockhaus, 1843-1845; Treasures of Art in Great Britain: Being an Account of the Chief Collections of Paintings, Drawings, Sculptures, Illuminated Mss., &c., &c. 3 vols and index. London: J. Murray, 1854; Galleries and Cabinets of Art in Great Britain: Being an Account of More than Forty Collections of Paintings, Drawings, Sculptures, Mss., &c. &c. Visited in 1854 and 1856, and Now for the First Time Described. London: J. Murray, 1857; Verzeichniss der Gemälde-Sammlung des am 18. Januar 1861 zu Berlin verstorbenen königlichen schwedischen und norwesgishcen Konsuls J. H. W. Wagener, welche durch letztwillige Bestimmung in den Besitz seiner Majestät des Königs übergegangen ist. Berlin: R. Decker, 1861; Handbuch der deutschen und niederländsichen Malerschulen. Stuttgart: Ebner & Seubert, 1862; edited new edition, with Crowe, Joseph Archer. Kugler, Franz. Handbook of Painting: the German, Flemish and Dutch Schools: Based on the Handbook of Kugler. London: J. Murray 1874; and Woltmann, Alfred. Kleine Schriften: Mit einer biographischen Skizze und dem Bildniss des Verfassers. Stuttgart: Ebner & Seubert, 1875.


Sources

Waagen, Gustav. Kleine Schriften: Mit einer biographischen Skizze und dem Bildniss des Verfassers. Stuttgart: Ebner & Seubert, 1875; Waetzoldt, Wilhelm. Deutsche Kunsthistoriker vom Sandrart bis Justi. 2 vols in 1. Berlin: Bruno Hessling, 1965, pp. (2) 29-45; Salerno, Luigi. “Historiography.” Encyclopedia of World Art. 7: 523, mentioned; Lightbown, Ronald W. “An Introduction to the 1970 Edition.” in, Waagen, Gustav. Works of Art and Artists in England. [facsimile reprint.] 3 vols. London: Cornmarket Press, 1970: unpaginated, 1 [i-ix]; Bickendorf, Gabriele. Der Beginn der Kunstgeschichtsschreibung unter dem Paradigma “Geschichte” : Gustav Friedrich Waagens Frühschrift “Ueber Hubert und Johann van Eyck”. Worms, Germany: Wernersche Verlagsgesellschaft, 1985; Bazin, Germain. Histoire de l’histoire de l’art: de Vasari à nos jours. Paris: Albin Michel, 1986, pp. 131, 528; Kultermann, Udo. The History of Art History. New York: Abaris, 1993, p. 145; Schwarzer, Mitchell. “Origins of the Art History Survey Text.” Art Journal 54 (Fall 1995): 24-5; Metzler Kunsthistoriker Lexikon: zweihundert Porträts deutschsprachiger Autoren aus vier Jahrhunderten. Stuttgart: Metzler, 1999, pp. 436-9.




Citation

"Waagen, Gustav Friedrich." Dictionary of Art Historians (website). https://arthistorians.info/waageng/.


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Director of the Berlin Gemäldegalerie1830, and first professor of art history in Berlin; leader of the so-called Berlin School of art history. Waagen’s father was the painter Christian Friedrich Waagen (b. 1750) and mother was Johanna Luise Albert

Wackenroder, Wilhelm Heinrich

Full Name: Wackenroder, Wilhelm Heinrich

Gender: male

Date Born: 1773

Date Died: 1798

Place Born: Berlin, Germany

Place Died: Berlin, Germany

Home Country/ies: Germany

Subject Area(s): German (culture, style, period) and Gothic (Medieval)


Overview

Significant influence on the development of German romantic feeling for gothic style; work on Nürnberg instituted the cult of Albrecht Dürer; ideas about the divine source or art influenced Schlegel and others,


Selected Bibliography

Herzensergiessungen eines Kunstliebended Klosterbruders. Berlin, 1797.;


Sources

KGK 145; SGE, xxiii-xiv, 281, Bazin 131; Metzler Kunsthistoriker Lexikon: zweihundert Porträts deutschsprachiger Autoren aus vier Jahrhunderten. Stuttgart: Metzler, 1999, pp. 439-41.




Citation

"Wackenroder, Wilhelm Heinrich." Dictionary of Art Historians (website). https://arthistorians.info/wackenroderw/.


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Significant influence on the development of German romantic feeling for gothic style; work on Nürnberg instituted the cult of Albrecht Dürer; ideas about the divine source or art influenced Schlegel and others,

Wackernagel, Martin

Full Name: Wackernagel, Martin

Gender: male

Date Born: 1881

Date Died: 1962

Place Born: Basel, Basle-Town, Switzerland

Place Died: Cottens, Fribourg, Switzerland

Home Country/ies: Switzerland

Subject Area(s): patronage and Renaissance

Institution(s): Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster


Overview

Scholar of Renaissance art patronage (largely through letters). Wackernagle hailed from a distinguished family of schoars. His father was the historian Rudolf Wackernagel, his uncle the Germanisten (German philologist) Wilhelm Wackernagel (1806-1869), and cousin the Sanskrit philologist Jacob Wackernagel (1853-1938). He wrote his dissertation in 1905 at the Humboldt-Universität in Berlin. That year he began as a research assistant to Arthur Haseloff on his trips to South Italy, photographing medieval art objects on glass plate, amassing nearly. 3200 examples. In 1909 he completed his habilitation, becoming a Privatdozent at the university at Halle. He married the poet Ilse von Stach in 1911. Wackernagel concluded his travels with Haselhof in 1915, appointed außerordentlicher (associate) Professor in 1917 at the university in Leipzig. He was called to the university in Münster (Westfalen) as ordentlicher (full) professor in 1920. He was conferred emeritus status in 1948.


Selected Bibliography

Der Lebensraum des Künstlers in der Florentinischen Renaissance. Leipzig: E. A. Seeman, 1938; English trans., The World of the Florentine Renaissance Artists: Projects and Patrons, Workshop and Art Market. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1981.


Sources

KRG, 1888 mentioned; KMP, 83; Metzler Kunsthistoriker Lexikon: zweihundert Porträts deutschsprachiger Autoren aus vier Jahrhunderten. Stuttgart: Metzler, 1999, pp. 441-3; Albrecht, Uwe. ed.  Arthur Haseloff und Martin Wackernagel: Mit Maultier und Kamera durch Unteritalien Forschungen zur Kunst im Südreich der Hohenstaufen (1905 -1915). Kiel: Ludwig, 2005



Contributors: Lee Sorensen


Citation

Lee Sorensen. "Wackernagel, Martin." Dictionary of Art Historians (website). https://arthistorians.info/wackernagelm/.


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Scholar of Renaissance art patronage (largely through letters). Wackernagle hailed from a distinguished family of schoars. His father was the historian Rudolf Wackernagel, his uncle the Germanisten (German philologist) Wilhelm Wackernagel

Waetzoldt, Stephan

Full Name: Waetzoldt, Stephan

Gender: male

Date Born: 1920

Home Country/ies: Germany


Overview

Directory, Staatliche Museen Preussischer Kulturbesitz Berlin. Waetzoldt’s father was the high-profile German art historian Wilhelm Waetzoldt, director General of the State Museums in Berlin.


Selected Bibliography

and Mai, Ekkehard. Kunstverwaltung, Bau- und Denkmal-Politik im Kaiserreich. Berlin: Mann, 1981; and Möller, Lise Lotte, and Spielmann, Heinz, eds. Das Frühe Plakat in Europa und den USA: ein Bestandskatalog. Berlin: Gebr. Mann, 1973ff.; Die Kopien des 17. Jahrhunderts nach Mosaiken und Wandmalereien in Rom. Vienna: Schroll-Verlag, 1964.





Citation

"Waetzoldt, Stephan." Dictionary of Art Historians (website). https://arthistorians.info/waetzoldts/.


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Directory, Staatliche Museen Preussischer Kulturbesitz Berlin. Waetzoldt’s father was the high-profile German art historian Wilhelm Waetzoldt, director General of the State Museums in Berlin.

Waetzoldt, Wilhelm

Full Name: Waetzoldt, Wilhelm

Gender: male

Date Born: 1880

Date Died: 1945

Place Born: Hamburg, Germany

Place Died: Halle, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany

Home Country/ies: Germany


Overview

Halle professor of art history and Director General of the State Museums and Secretary in the Prussian Ministry of Culture 1927/1929-1933. Waetzoldt graduated from the Magdeburg “Unser Lieben Frauen” Gymnasium in 1899. He began studying philology, philosophy, literature and history at the universities of Berlin, Magdeburg and Hamburg. In 1903, he was awarded his Ph.D. from Berlin with a dissertation written on the philosphy of the dramatist Friedrich Hebbel (1813-1863), written under Wilhelm Dilthey (1833-1911). In 1901 he began studying art history, first under the medievalist Adolph Goldschmidt and then, more significantly, under Heinrich Wölfflin, whose Berlin art history institute Waetzoldt ran for all the year Wölfflin was in Berlin (1901-1912). Literature, however, was Waeztoldt’s primary publishing interest during these years. During the 1908-1909 year, he worked under a stipend (arranged by Berlin Museums director Wilhelm Bode) as an assistant at the Kunsthistorisches Institute in Florence. Following that, Waetzoldt moved to Hamburg to assist the independent art scholar Aby M. Warburg in running his magnificent library. This experience gave him entre in 1911 as Keeper of the library of the State Museums of Berlin, again called by Bode. In 1912 Waetzoldt was appointed Professor of Modern Art History at the University of Halle, replacing his mentor Goldschmidt. During the First World War, the 34-year-old Waetzoldt served as a reservist in the German army; his missions included the dangerous western front, fighting in the Battle of Soissons, and rising to the rank of lieutenant. Twice wounded, he was awarded the Iron Cross, second class in 1916 and returned to lecturing at Halle. In 1920 Waetzoldt was assigned to the Preußischen Kultusministerium (Prussian Ministry of Culture). He published an important biographical art historiography, Deutsche Kunsthistoriker during this time. In 1927 he was appointed Director General of the State Museums of Berlin. His tenure included the new building of the Pergamon Museum. He was named a Senator of the Preußischen Akademie der Künste (Prussian Academy of Arts) in 1929. The rise to power of the Nazis in 1933 meant trouble for Waetzoldt. He witnessed the mismissal of director of the National Gallery, Ludwig Justi for supporting modern art and the forced retirement of the director Kaiser Friedrich Museum, Max J. Friedländer, for being Jewish. The government accused Waetzoldt of fostering degenerate, i.e., modern art (“Entarteten Kunst”), financial irregularities, and the promotion Jews. Waeztoldt refused to join the NSDAP ( Nazi party), and returned to his Ordinarius professorship at Halle. There he acted as Dean of the Faculty of Philosophy between 1938 and 1940 and appointed honorary professor at the University of Berlin. During his final years, Waetzoldt produced less scholarly and more popular works fitting into the Nazi conception of German art, books on Albrecht Dürer and Hans Holbein. His vademecum, Du und die Kunst (You and Art) was given a special printing and distributed to the Hitler Youth. He died shortly before the conclusion of the war. Waetzoldt’s son was Stephan Waetzoldt Director of the Staatliche Museen Preussischer Kulturbesitz. His Halle students included Oskar Hagen. As an art historiographer Waetzoldt stood in the tradition of Ernst Heidrich Beiträge zur Geschichte und Methode der Kunstgeschichte (1917) and Julius Alwin von Schlosser Die Kunstliteratur (1924) and “Stilgeschichte” und “Sprachgeschichte” in der bildenden Kunst (1935), whom he dedicated his Deutsche Kunsthistoriker. His predecessors included Hans Hermann Russack Der Begriff des Rhythmus bei den deutschen Kunsthistorikern des XIX. Jahrhunderts (1910); Rudolf Kautzsch Der Begriff der Entwicklung in der Kunstgeschichte (1917); and Johannes Jahn Die Kunstwissenschaft der Gegenwert in Sebstdarstellung (1924).


Selected Bibliography

[complete bibliography (to 1940):] Deutschland – Italien: Beiträge zu de Kulturbeziehungen zwischen Norden und Süden: Festschrift für Wilhelm Waetzoldt. Berlin: G. Grote, 1941, pp. xx-xxxvi; [dissertation:] Hebbel und die Philosophie seiner Zeit. Berlin, 1903, issued, Gräfenhainichen: Druck von W. Hecker,1903; Deutsche Kunsthistoriker vom Sandrart bis Justi. 2 vols. Leipzig: E. A. Seeman, 1921-24.


Sources

Wölfflin, Heinrich. Heinrich Wölfflin, 1864-1945: Autobiographie, Tagebücher und Briefe. Joseph Ganter, ed. 2nd ed. Basel: Schwabe & Co., 1984, p. 503; Metzler Kunsthistoriker Lexikon: zweihundert Porträts deutschsprachiger Autoren aus vier Jahrhunderten. 2nd ed. Stuttgart: Metzler, 2007, pp. 472-475.




Citation

"Waetzoldt, Wilhelm." Dictionary of Art Historians (website). https://arthistorians.info/waetzoldtw/.


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Halle professor of art history and Director General of the State Museums and Secretary in the Prussian Ministry of Culture 1927/1929-1933. Waetzoldt graduated from the Magdeburg “Unser Lieben Frauen” Gymnasium in 1899. He began studying philology,

Wagner-Rieger, Renate

Full Name: Wagner-Rieger, Renate

Other Names:

  • Renate Wagner-Rieger

Gender: female

Date Born: 1921

Date Died: 1980

Place Born: Vienna, Vienna state, Austria

Place Died: Vienna, Vienna state, Austria

Home Country/ies: Austria

Subject Area(s): architecture (object genre) and sculpture (visual works)


Overview

Architectural and art historian. Rieger studied art history in 1942 at the University in Vienna writing her dissertation under Karl Maria Swoboda. She was hired as a research assistant in 1945. She worked during the de-Nazification of the University, becoming a Lecturer in 1956. That year, too, she married the historian Walter Wagner (b. 1923). At the same time her research on early gothic architecture in Italy and a paper on historicism presented to the 1964 International Congress of Art History in Bonn brought her to international attention. Wagner-Rieger was appointed associate professor in Vienna in 1964. She was appointed director of the Forschungsunternehmen Wiener Ringstrasse. She became an editor of the prestigeous Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte. In 1971 she was appointed professor of Austrian art history. Wagner-Rieger was not only a leading architectural historian, but particularly well known to the public.


Selected Bibliography

[complete bibliography] Österreichische Zeitschrift für Kunst und Denkmalpflege Wien 35 no 1-2 (1981): 71-77; also, Mitteilungen der Gesellschaft für Vergleichende Kunstforschung in Wien 33 no.3-4 (1981): 5-10.


Sources

Metzler Kunsthistoriker Lexikon: zweihundert Porträts deutschsprachiger Autoren aus vier Jahrhunderten. Stuttgart: Metzler, 1999, pp. 446-9; Krause, Walter. “Wagner-Rieger, Renate.” Dictionary of Art; [Obituary] Österreichische Zeitschrift für Kunst und Denkmalpflege Wien 35 no 1-2 (1981): 70-71; Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte 44 no. 2 (1981): 196-198; “150 Jahre Kunstgeschichgte an der Universität Wien.” http://www.univie.ac.at/kunstgeschichte-tutorium/wienerschule/geschichte.htm.




Citation

"Wagner-Rieger, Renate." Dictionary of Art Historians (website). https://arthistorians.info/wagnerriegerr/.


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Architectural and art historian. Rieger studied art history in 1942 at the University in Vienna writing her dissertation under Karl Maria Swoboda. She was hired as a research assistant in 1945. She worked during the de-Nazi

Waldmann, Emil

Full Name: Waldmann, Emil

Gender: male

Date Born: 1880

Date Died: 1945

Place Born: Bremen, Germany

Place Died: Würzburg, Bavaria, Germany

Home Country/ies: Germany


Overview

Waldmann’s touching eulogy to Julius Meier-Graefe demonstrated his appreciation for the historiography of art in genres other than his own. During his time as a student at Heidelberg, his colleagues included Rosa Schapire, Edwin Redslob, Walter Kaesbach, Ernst Kühnel.



Sources

Metzler Kunsthistoriker Lexikon: zweihundert Porträts deutschsprachiger Autoren aus vier Jahrhunderten. Stuttgart: Metzler, 1999, pp. 449-52; [Meier-Graefe comment] Kultermann, Udo. The History of Art History. New York: Abaris, 1993, p. 156




Citation

"Waldmann, Emil." Dictionary of Art Historians (website). https://arthistorians.info/waldmanne/.


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Waldmann’s touching eulogy to Julius Meier-Graefe demonstrated his appreciation for the historiography of art in genres other than his own. During his time as a student at Heidelberg, his colleagues included

Waldstein, Charles

Full Name: Waldstein, Charles

Other Names:

  • Charles Walston

Gender: male

Date Born: 1856

Date Died: 1927

Place Born: New York, NY, USA

Place Died: Naples, Campania, Italy

Home Country/ies: United States

Subject Area(s): Classical


Overview

Early classical art historian at Cambridge University, part of the classical art studies curriculum created by Sidney Colvin. Waldstein was the son of Henry Waldstein and Sophie Srisheim (Waldstein), German Jewish immigrants. His father was a merchant in the city. The younger Waldstein attended Columbia College of Columbia University, New York, and then the university in Heidelberg for graduate work. He moved to England in 1876, receiving his Ph.D. at King’s College, Cambridge. His mentor was the scholar Henry Bradshaw (1831-1886). Waldstein entered teaching at Cambridge University as a lecturer in classics in 1880. In 1883 he was appointed to the first readership in classical archaeology, an initiative launched by Sidney Colvin, succeeding Colvin as director of the Fitzwilliam Museum as well. Waldstein’s interest within the classics were principally art. As no where in England were degrees given in art history, Waldstein pioneered the teaching the subject of classical sculpture, painting, and topography. In 1885 he published his first book a monograph on the (then believed to be) works of the fifth-century Greek sculptor Phidias, Essays on the Art of Pheidias. His belief in the object resulted in passionate advocating of plaster casts collections of ancient sculpture at Cambridge. He left the Fitzwilliam directorship in 1889 to become director of the American School at Athens, a position he held until 1893. He joined the excavations at Plataea 1889-1890, and then the tomb of Aristotle, Eretria beginning in 1891, before excavating the temple of Hera near the Argos in 1892-1895. The younger American scholar Joseph Clark Hoppin assisted him on the latter dig. His 1894 monograph on the art critic and art historian John Ruskin demonstrated his broad art interests. The first of his two Slade professorships of art at Cambridge began in 1895 (to 1901). His inaugural lecture was on the important of art [history] studies in universities. Waldstein joined Baron Pierre de Coubertin (1863-1937) to assist in (re)founding the Olympic games, competing himself and winning a silver medal for shooting for the United States, of which he was still a citizen, at the 1896 Athens games. He became a British subject in 1899. In 1904 he began a second Slade professorship, lasting until 1911. Waldstein married a New Yorker, Florence Seligman in 1909. The cast collection at the Fitzwilliam which he had largely assembled was separated in 1910, against Waldstein’s approval. He was knighted in 1912. The Waldstein’s Anglicized their name to Walston in 1918 to avoid association with Germany and the World War. This change and his peerage did not prevent accusations by George Edmund Milnes Monckton-Arundell, Viscount Galway, (1844-1931) of being a German sympathizer, which he fought in a libel suit after the War. He attempted, vainly it turned out, to create an international committee to preserve and exploration Herculaneum, ultimately blocked by the Italian government. Walston died in Naples in 1927. An undergraduate travel fund to Greece is named in his honor. Waldstein’s books are not read today and seem naive. His importance lies as a promoter and one of the founders of classical archaeology studies at University of Cambridge. Mary Beard describes his demeanor at Cambridge as somewhat “pushy,” though a dynamic lecturer.


Selected Bibliography

Essays on the Art of Pheidias. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1885; The Work of John Ruskin: its Influence Upon Modern Thought and Life. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1893; The Study of Art in Universities: Inaugural Lecture of the Slade Professor of Fine Art in the University of Cambridge. New York: Harper, 1896; Alcamenes and the Establishment of the Classical Type in Greek Art. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University press, 1926; Notes on Greek Sculpture. I. The Constantinople Pentathlete and Early Athlete Statues. II. A Marble Draped Female Figure in Burlington House. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1927. -Nigel Spivey


Sources

“Slander By Lord Galway, Walston v. Galway.” [biographical information] Times (London) March 29, 1919, p 4; Spivey, Nigel. “Walston (formerly Waldstein), Sir Charles.” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography; Beard, Mary. “Mrs. Arthur Strong, Morelli, and the Troopers of Cortés.” in, Donohue, A. A. and Fullerton, Mark D., eds. Ancient Art and its Historiography. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2002, pp. 152; [obituary:] “The Late Sir Charles Walston.” Times (London) Mar 24, 1927, 16.




Citation

"Waldstein, Charles." Dictionary of Art Historians (website). https://arthistorians.info/waldsteinc/.


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Early classical art historian at Cambridge University, part of the classical art studies curriculum created by Sidney Colvin. Waldstein was the son of Henry Waldstein and Sophie Srisheim (Waldstein), German Jewish immigrants

Waley, Arthur

Full Name: Waley, Arthur

Gender: male

Date Born: unknown

Date Died: unknown

Home Country/ies: United Kingdom

Subject Area(s): Asian, Central Asian, and prints (visual works)

Career(s): curators


Overview

Curator of Asian prints, British Museum.


Selected Bibliography

A Catalogue of Paintings recovered from Tun-huang by Sir Aurel Stein, K.C.I.E., Preserved in the Sub-Department of Oriental Prints and Drawings in the British Museum, and in the Museum of Central Asian Antiquities, Delhi. London: British Museum, 1931.





Citation

"Waley, Arthur." Dictionary of Art Historians (website). https://arthistorians.info/waleya/.


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Curator of Asian prints, British Museum.

Walicki, Michał

Full Name: Walicki, Michał

Gender: male

Date Born: unknown

Date Died: unknown

Home Country/ies: Poland

Subject Area(s): Baroque, Dutch (culture or style), Dutch Golden Age, and Netherlandish Renaissance-Baroque styles


Overview

Scholar of the Dutch baroque; Warsaw University Professor. Walicki was a curator at the National Museum in Warsaw. In 1950 Walicki was arrested by the Stalinist regime and replaced by Stanislaw Lorentz. His students included Jan Białostocki. His methodology followed a strong connoisseurship model.



Sources

Skubiszewski, Piotr. “Jan Białostocki” Burlington Magazine 81 (1989): 422.




Citation

"Walicki, Michał." Dictionary of Art Historians (website). https://arthistorians.info/walickim/.


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Scholar of the Dutch baroque; Warsaw University Professor. Walicki was a curator at the National Museum in Warsaw. In 1950 Walicki was arrested by the Stalinist regime and replaced by Stanislaw Lorentz. His students included

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