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  • Published the volume on Alcalá de Henares and Guadalajara, in the "Art in Spain" series by the Hispanic Society of America.
  • Author of the first volume in the important Ars Hispaniae series (1947).
  • Historian and critic of Spanish colonial art and culture. Angulo Iñiguez received his undergraduate at the University in Seville in History in 1920. In 1922 he was awarded his Ph.D. from the Universidad Central de Madrid for a thesis on the Renaissance goldsmiths of Seville. He began his career in Seville, where he studied the archives of the Indies. In 1930 he published his dissertation on Andalusian sculpture and established the Laboratorio de Arte Americano (Laboratory of American Art).
  • Author of the thirteenth volume in the important Ars Hispaniae series (1949).
  • Published the volume on Velazquez in the Prado Museum, in the "Art in Spain" series by the Hispanic Society of America.
  • Spanish Renaissance art and architectural history
  • Academic and painter; wrote dictionary of Spanish art historians in the manner of Vasari. The son of don Francisco Ceán Bermudez and doña Manuela Maria de Cifuentes, Ceán Bermudez was primarily educated in his hometown of Gijón moving to Oviedo where he obtained his baccalaureat in philosophy from a Jesuit college. As his father could not afford sending his son to the university, Ceán Bermúdez put himself in the service of Gaspar de Jovellanos (1744-1811). Jovellanos (who was only five years older than himself), just as the latter was finishing his studies in Alcalá de Henares (1765).
  • Professor of art and architectural history at the school of architecture in Madrid. He published monographs on the cathedrals of Valladolid and Salamanca. Chueca Goitia authored the thirteenth volume in the important Ars Hispaniae series, Arquitectura del siglo XVI (1953).
  • Poet, composer and author of a major symbol dictionary and co-author of Ars Hispaniae. Cirlot was the son of Juan Cirlot and Maria Laporta. After graduating from the College of the Jesuits, Barcelona, he worked as a customs agent and at the Banco Hispanoamericano. His initial interest was in music, which he studied until called as a soldier to fight against Franco in the Second Spanish Republic, 1937. With their defeat he was again mobilized by the Franco regime in 1940.
  • Art historian, educational theorist, professor and El Greco scholar; co-founder of Summa artis, historia general del arte. The son of Patricio Bartolomé Flores, a judge, and of Natalia Cossío Salinas, Cossío studied at the Colegio El Escorial and at the Instituto de Ávila where he obtained his baccalaureate in 1871. He attended the Central University in Madrid enrolling in philosophy and literature courses and studying art history and archeology. Many Spanish intellectuals were under the influence of the German philosopher Karl Krauss (1781-1832).
  • Pupil of Morelli and correspondent with Bernard Berenson (q.v.)
  • Scholar of Spanish art and Rubens. Cruzada Villaamil researched Peter Paul Rubens' lifelong ties with Spain, tracing the inventories of Philip IV through individual paintings. He compiled the Rubens Works he considered lost and extant. In 1880 Carl Justi continued research on this and Cruzada Villaamil's work ultimately set the foundation for Rubens catalog by Max Rooses. Cruzada Villaamil's invertory of Rubens' paintings "remains a basic reference of Rubens' Paintings in Spain" (Alpers)
  • Director of Laboratorio de Arte at the University of Seville; historian of Spanish, Spanish-American and Andalousian art. Díaz was born in Seville, where he attended the Instituto general y tecnico, and then the Faculty of Philosophy and Letters. He moved to Madrid for his PhD where he earned his doctoral degree under the direction of Manuel Gómez Moreno. He started his teaching career with a temporary position at the Faculty of Philosophy and Letters in Sevilla, and as a professor and director of the Instituto de enseñanzas medias Murillo in Madrid.
  • Published the volume on The House of El Greco, in the "Art in Spain" series by the Hispanic Society of America.
  • Author of the eight volume in the important Ars Hispaniae series (1956).

  • Author of an early biography of Spanish artists. Díaz del Valle was a singer and court personage in the Capilla Real and Chaplain to Charles II of Spain. There he met many of the court painters, including Diego Velázquez, Sebastián de Herrera Barnuevo, Pedro de la Torre and Juan Escalante. His avocation was writing, though his works remained in manuscript. He wrote a three-volume history, Noticia histórica del principio de la Inquisición y la historia y nobleza del Reino de León y Principado de Asturias.
  • Published the volume on Seville in the "Art in Spain" series by the Hispanic Society of America.
  • Historian of Spanish art. Two important works appeared by him in 1948; he and José Pijoán issued their Las pinturas murales románicas de Cataluña and he and Juan Antonio Gaya Nuño published their Arquitectura y escultura románicas, the latter for the important Ars Hispaniae series. Gudiol introduced the Spanish symbologist Juan Cirlot to Gothic art. 1985 saw the death of three emenent Spanish-subject art historians, Harold Wethy, Enrique Lafuente Ferrari and Gudiol.
  • Professor at Toulouse; wrote monograph on Zubarán; Director of Casa Velázquez, Institut français at Madrid
  • Historian, archeologist, professor of art history; consolidated the reputation of Spanish art history within the country. His father, the descendant of a noble family which had established itself in Granada in the seventeenth century, was a painter and archeologist and a tireless traveler.
  • Director of Laboratorio de Arte at the University of Seville; historian of Spanish, Spanish-American and Andalousian art. Hernández Díaz attended the Instituto general y tecnico in Sevilla, and then the Faculty of Philosophy and Letters. He moved to Madrid for his Ph. D., where he earned his doctoral degree under the direction of Manuel Gómez Moreno (q.v.). He started his teaching career with a temporary position at the Faculty of Philosophy and Letters in Sevilla, and as a professor and director of the Instituto de enseñanzas medias Murillo in Madrid.
  • Historian of Spanish art, particularly Goya. Lafuente was a disciple of Manuel Gómez Moreno (q.v.). He was a professor at the Universidad Complutense y de la Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando In Madrid. His Breve historia de la pintura española (Brief History of Spanish Painting) appeared in 1934. In 1935 he published de La pintura española del s XVII. During the years of Franco's Spain, Lafuente Ferrari translated the groundbreaking work of Werner Wiesbach (q.v.) on the Baroque, Barock als Kunst der Gegenreformation into Spanish, supplying an introduction.
  • Architectural historian; professor in the history of art the Madrid School of Architecture
  • historian of Spanish Art; professor of Madrid
  • Author of the first Prado catalog and Director of the Museo de Arte Moderno, Madrid, 1885-1898. Madrazo was the son of the painter José de Madrazo y Agudo (1781-1859). He studied law in Spain before contemporary art in Paris. Madrazo published articles of art criticism in El artista in 1835 and 1836 before returning to Madrid in 1840, continuing to contribute to the journals El laberinto, El español and No me olvides. Madrazo was commissioned to write the first permanent holdings catalog for the Museo del Prado which was published in 1843.
  • Director of the Art History department at the university in Seville. In 1945. Marco Dorta received his undergraduate degree at the Universidad de La Laguna. He wrote his dissertation under Diego Angulo Iñiguez in Madrid 1940 with a topic of new-world Indian maps. In 1943 he accepted a position with the Catedrático de Arte Hispanico Americano of the Universidades de Sevilla. He and Mario J.
  • Archaeologist and historian of classical and ancient Spanish art. Alinari came from a prominent Spanish family, receiving most of his education in Madrid. He was hired as an assistant in the archives department of Madrid's Museo Arqueologico. After being appointed head of the department in 1884, Alinari began cataloguing objects in preparation for the construction of a room in the museum dedicated to the display of ancient Spanish art. As an expert in antiquities, his knowledge and scholarship were in high demand.
  • Published the volume on The Royal Palace Madrid, in the "Art in Spain" series by the Hispanic Society of America.
  • Baroque and Classicism; diachronic theory of art history
  • Spanish art history; Renaissance

  • Painter, wrote an early biography of several artists influential for Spain. Pacheco was born to a presumably humble Andalusian family; he was raised by uncle, also named Francisco Pacheco, a canon of the Seville Cathedral. The young man assumed his more eminent uncle's surname. After studying under the painter Luis Fernández ( fl 1542-1581) around 1580, he achieved master painter status by1585. From his uncle, Pacheco gained an appreciation for humanist studies, especially literature, and poetry in particular.
  • Wrote El Parnaso español pintoresco laureado, an early biographical account of Spanish painters. Palomino's family moved to Córdoba when he was ten. He was prepared for the priesthood and taught drawing and painting. Under the guidance of Juan de Valdés Leal and Juan de Alfaro y Gómez, a former pupil of Diego Velázquez, he was recommend to Madrid in 1678 to work under Juan Carreño de Miranda and Claudio Coello. He also studied mathematics at the Jesuit Colegio Imperial by Fray Jacob Kresa.
  • Co-editor of major art-history encyclopedia, Summa Artis. Pijoán began his career in Spain. In 1914 he issued a general account of world art, Historia de arte. He married Genevieve Bugnion (Pijoán). In the United States Pijoan taught at Pomona College. He reissued and updated his Historia in a three-volume English edition in 1928, with Robert B. Harshe (q.v.) of the Art Institute of Chicago and Ralph Loveland Roys (1879-1965). In 1930 Pijoán was put in charge of selecting a muralist to decorate the refectory of the college.
  • architectural historian; founded a school of reserach in Spanish art history; suggested early style of Romanesque found in the architecture around the Mediterranean Sea
  • He collaborated with Eleanor Sayre (q.v.) on the 1989 exhibition "Goya and the Spirit of Enlightenment."
  • Historian of Spanish painting from the 17th-19th centuries and museum director. Salas began studying art history at the Universidad de Barcelona, and later studied in Vienna and Berlin. He was appointed Professor of Art History at the Universidad Compultense de Madrid, and attended the salons of the Academia Breve de Critica de Arte in 1946-7, organized by Eugene d'Ors. In 1947, Salas moved to London, and wrote for the magazine Goya about museum collections. He completed monographs on Vel'squez and Goya, and published articles in several Spanish journals.
  • Zurbaran scholar and co-author of the Pelican History of Art volume, Baroque Art and Architecture in Spain and Portugal and Their American Dominions, 1500-1800. Soria was the son of Carlos Schapira, Ph.D., (1879-1957), an engineer (and later Technical Director) at Telefunken, Berlin, and Pola (Heilpern) Schapira (1887-1964).  The couple changed their name to "Soria" to avoid the anti-semitism in Germany at the time.

  • Author of the second volume in the important Ars Hispaniae series (1947).
  • Chair in art history at the University of Madrid; Minister of Public Instruction; his Monastery of Guadalupe was chosen for English translation by the Hispanic Society of America for their series Art in Spain. Tomro was among the first generation of professional Spanish art historians (Bazin), whose ranks included.
  • Author of the fourth volume in the important Ars Hispaniae series (1949).