Stanton, Phoebe

Full Name: 
Stanton, Phoebe
Other Names: 
Phoebe Stanton
née Phoebe Baroody
Year Born: 
1915
Year Died: 
2003
Place Born: 
Carroll County, IL, USA
Place Died: 
Baltimore, MD, USA
Home Country: 
USA
Overview: 
Johns Hopkins University architectural historian. Baroody's family was of Lebanese extraction. She herself was raised in Chicago until young girlhood, when the family moved to California. She made a trip at age 14 to Lebanon which changed her worldview. Baroody attended Mount Holyoke and Radcliffe Colleges, doing graduate work at Stanford University. During the Second World War she worked for the Board of Economic Securities in Washington, DC. After the war, Stanton moved to London to complete her Ph.D. at the University of London's Courtauld Institute, where she studied under Nikolaus Pevsner, John Summerson and met Siegfried Giedeon. In 1954, she and her husband, Daniel J. Stanton (d. 1966), a city planner, moved to Baltimore,, where he was employed in urban renewal. Stanton began teaching at Johns Hopkins University in 1955 as one of its first female professors. She remained at Hopkins her entire career. In 1971 she was appointed William R. Keenan, Jr. Professorial Chair of the Department of Art History at Hopkins. The same year she began writing architectural criticism for the Baltimore Sun, a position which she held for five years. Through this she gained a wide public following and found a venue for her strong feelings on architecture. She retired from the University in 1982. She died of a heart ailment in 2003. Her son, Michael Stanton, is also an academic in Design at the University of Beruit. Stanton was known for her strong opinions of both architecture and other architectural historians. She published as small work on Pugin in the 1970s, and continuing a larger, comprehensive work on the father and son. It was completed shortly before her death.
Selected Bibliography: 
The Gothic Revival & American Church Architecture: an Episode in Taste, 1840-1856. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press, 1968; Pugin. New York: Viking Press, 1972.
Sources: 
Dilts, James D. Newsletter. Society of Architectural Historians. http://www.sah.org/nsah/current/obituaries.pdf